Measuring Out Poetry with Coffee Spoons

Noteworthy

April is upon already.  Easter, Passover, and Baseball. 

What’s that you say?  Poetry?

Excuse me, did you say poetry?  Do you mean to tell me that there is a whole month dedicated to poetry?  Well, if that doesn’t just beat all. 

As a minority myself who only gets one month out of the year, I feel for poetry.  Prose gets 11 and poetry gets 1.  But it’s a start.  And start I shall by mentioning a few stellar works of international poets.

What’s that you say?  You didn’t realize that other countries besides the United States had romantic bohos running amok and experiencing life with a bloodsucking passion that defies all?  They do.  And, boy, do they.

“I expect to become a very wicked madman.”

That is  Rimbaud, the French phenom who swore off poetry at 21.  And if you think that’s awful young to make a rash decision, how about Sabine Sicaud?  Her book, To Speak, to Tell You?, was penned in the last year of life.  She died at 15.  These are poems of deep insight and feeling and not to be missed.  They will truly remind you of what is important in life, those abstract things that never seem to be absent from generation to generation.  The things we avoid with modern trappings…not a mention of twitter or facebook in this collection. 

And speaking of Sicaud, she is published by Black Widow Press  whom happen to be a favorite of mine.  They have done the works of Eluard, Desnos, Breton and Larbaud

Larbaud, you dare say you’ve never heard of?  Du calme, mon ami.

He wrote a lovely little collections of poem that seems like it was poured out of time capsule.   Poems of A. O. Barnabooth are engaging and the penultimate expression of the stereotype of a restless soul.

From Black Widow to a burning deck. 

Burning deck, you say?  Excuse me, I don’t quite follow the non-sequitor.

Burnng Deck Press is a humdinger of a literary poetry press.  Small, exquisite collections of high-class poetry that is not afraid to take on the taboo or the trite.  One of my faves fromt his press is Caroline DuBois’ You are the Business which is part of their Serie d’Ecriture, a French poetry series.

And last I must pay homage to New Directions.

They published the winner of the The Best Translated Book Award for Poetry in 2008, For the Spirit of the Fighting Walnut by Takashi Hiraide.  Simple and stunning, read it just for the phrase; ‘half-cooked sunset.’  And how could we dismiss New Directions taking the high road and being there to publish The Romantic Dogs by Roberto Bolano?  Let the bigs take 2666, leave the gems to ND.

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